Colombian Spanish’ Use of Pues and Time

While Colombians use the standard Spanish language when it comes to “Time” -there’s a lot more to that. Another thing we should understand aside from the proper use of honoraries and pronunciation to several of their words is the correct usage of the word “pues.” The Use of Pues If you visit the Antioquia region … Continue reading “Colombian Spanish’ Use of Pues and Time”

While Colombians use the standard Spanish language when it comes to “Time” -there’s a lot more to that. Another thing we should understand aside from the proper use of honoraries and pronunciation to several of their words is the correct usage of the word “pues.”

The Use of Pues

If you visit the Antioquia region or perhaps Medellin, encountering the word “pues” is as common as it gets. Paisas (the people residing in Antioquia or in short, the locals) use this word as “filler” whenever they need to think something first before saying anything. The most accurate translation of the word “pues” in English is “Err…” This simple example “pues…no sé” means “err… I don’t know” – get the picture?

Understanding time when speaking Colombian Spanish

8 days a week and every 15 days – Looks like the famous band “The Beatles” ain’t joking around when they’ve completed composing the song “8 days a week” after all. Or perhaps they were in Colombia during that time. Yes, Colombians have 8 days a week and not seven. I don’t know why they prefer it this way even if it’s “as clear as day” confusing. So whenever you ask someone where they hang around every week, you’ll likely hear them saying …Cada ocho dias or in English “every eight days.” The confusion continues when you ask an event that’ll happen in two weeks (14 days) for example, they’ll likely say “cada quince dias” or every fifteen days. Yet again, one day is added to it.

Ahora/Ahorita – As you’d probably guessed by now, the words “ahora” and “ahorita” are yet again what we call “really confusing words to tell time.” Although it means “now” in standard Spanish, the use of these words heavily depends on the sentence used. It could mean as is -which is the standard meaning “now” or it could also mean “just a moment, in a little bit or earlier.” Thankfully, the word “ahora” depends entirely on the sentence used and refers to a more recent event while “ahorita” depicts an event in the distant future or distant past. To avoid getting confused to the word “ahora” (even avoid it completely) –just use “ya” which means “already” to your dialogues or conversations.